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PSN: gtvault-com
Joined: 08/27/2001
Last on: 10/20/2017
Setups: 11
Posts: 1368
A couple enhancements
Posted 08/28/2005 6:48 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Kerr's info
I just released a couple enhancements to the site. First, members who were here for the original incarnation of GTVault will remember the Site Stats section listing a total count of users and setups. I've reintroduced the Site Statistics, which you'll find at the bottom left corner of each page. It's not one of those "couldn't live without it features", which is why I didn't set it up until now.

Secondly, I retooled the Top Ten Lists. You may now look at each top ten category for the last 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, last year, or forever. This levels the playing field by showcasing newer and recently active tuners. In addition, I added a new category named "Votes per Setup". Enjoy!
Owner - GTVault

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Posted 08/28/2005 7:14 PM Post a reply Quote this post View sub_lethal's info
___Those are some cool additions Kerr. I really like the new Top Ten format, I'm playing around with it right now.
Sub_Lethal Racing...

Killing Times Since '99

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Posted 08/29/2005 5:46 PM Post a reply Quote this post View rigger's info
'Votes per Setup' is an excellent addition! keep up the good work!

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Set-Up Guide to cocking your car's handling up
Posted 08/31/2005 10:59 AM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
I read the set-up guide and was so stunned by how wrong it was I felt I had to correct it. If the webmaster is reading this and would like someone to write a factually-accurate set-up guide – I'd be more than happy to do so. Please note that I've only altered it, not re-written it (except the LSD section) and I've only included the sections to which I made the most changes.

I make nice cakes,

Mr Kipling

Understeering and Oversteering

Understeering is caused by a lack of grip at the car’s front in turning into a corner leading to the front wheels sliding towards the outside of the bend. That is, creating the sensation that the car doesn’t want to turn. Generally, FWD and (poorly set-up) 4WD cars exhibit understeering characteristics.

Oversteering is the tendency of a car’s rear to slip out in mid-corner. That is, the car spins out too much. Generally speaking, RWD cars exhibit oversteering characteristics.

Oversteering is not the be confused with "Drifting" or "Power Sliding". Generally, drifting is induced with wheels losing grip intentionally and should be controllable with the throttle. Whereas, understeering and oversteering is uncontrollable and unwanted (THIS IS ALL BOLLOCKS).

Our aim is to balance the understeer and oversteer as much as possible, in order to attain a faster lap-time. Although in real life, a slightly understeering (wrong again - slightly oversteering) car is always faster than a understeering car. A car that oversteers will allow the driver to carry more speed out of the turn, and allows for greater degrees of throttle adjustability.

There are two kinds of oversteer, and two kinds of understeer:

Power Oversteer: Caused by the application of too much power to the rear wheels, spinning them up and breaking tractions with the road. Affects Rear wheel drive and some high-powered 4WD cars.

Lift-off Oversteer: Generally afflicts front wheel drive cars and is caused by the driver lifting off mid-corner. This causes the weight to move to the front of the car causing the rear wheels to lose traction and, because the polar moment is at the front of the car, travel towards the front of the car.

Understeer: Front wheels in a lateral slide towards the outside of a track. Usually possible to recover by inducing lift-off oversteer or using left-foot braking.

Terminal Understeer: When the understeer is so extreme there is no longer enough potential energy in the car to escape it. I.e. there's not enough side-loading to induce lift-off oversteer, but the tyres are so far beyond the limit of adhesion, you just have to wait until the car slows enough to regain traction. Very scary in real life.

Spring Rates and Roll Bars

The Spring Rate controls the transfer of weight of the car. During braking and acceleration the weight of the car shifts forwards, backwards and side-to-side. Softer front springs aid in shifting the weight to the front, thereby reducing understeer. Softer rear springs allow the weight to transfer to the rear, consequently reducing oversteer (crass, but ok). Alternatively, to induce understeer or oversteer, do the opposite and stiffen the corresponding spring rates. Keep in mind that spring rates that are too soft produce a car that is not as responsive as one with a stiffer spring rate. So, you have to find a compromise. Use of roll bar settings also greatly influence the way a car handles (as mentioned above) as they control the speed (and therefore the manner) at which weight is transferred across the car. To use very simple terms: stiff roll bars mean Grip, Grip, Grip, Grip, Barrier (fast but sketchy); soft roll bars mean Grip, Slide, Slide, Slide, Barrier (slower but more predictable).

Let's use a medium weight FR car (1200kg) as an example. Since you want more grip at the rear during acceleration in an FR car, the spring rates, if hard, resists the weight to the rear, making the rear hard and want to fight back, loosing grip. So we want to make the rear take more weight during acceleration for better traction. Front engined/rear drive cars have the best weight balance, therefore have the most balanced set-up of all the configurations. They have the least issues with undue weight transfer (like mid-corner throttle lift-off) and have more benign handling.

In an FF car, since the driving wheels are in the front and weight goes to the back, during acceleration, we make the rear spring rates as stiff as possible to resist the front wheels from loosing too much grip. Much more important in an FF car however, is eliminating the handling problems intrinsically linked with powering the steering wheels. That is, of course, chronic understeer. The most obvious way for a driver to eliminate understeer is to either slow down (!) or using trail and left-foot braking. From a car set-up point of view though, you must make the front as soft as possible and the rear as hard as possible (roll bars and spring-rates) and work towards the middle until you find and appropriate balance. The best way to stop a car from understeering is to make it oversteer but, in a FF car this isn't practical thanks to not being able to adjust the attitude of the 'slide' with the throttle. So, give your front wheel drive car chronic lift-off oversteer tendancies and you've got yourself a fast FF car.
Toe

Is the angle of the tires, as viewed from the top of the car.
4WD and FF use -1.0 / 0.5 (front/rear) as a start. FR and RR use 0.0 / -0.5. Negative toe in the rear wheels will stop oversteer because the wheels are at this angle /--\ (looking from the top of the car). That's great for corners but reduces acceleration on the exits and straights because there isn't as much tyre contact to the ground as a zero toe like this |--| . So as you can see there is a compromise. Actually, a slight 'Toe in' (negative toe) will improve acceleration as the tyres won't be dragging under load. The force exerted on the wheels causes a natural toe-out under acceleration, ergo toe-in will mean the wheels track straight under load. As Keke Rosberg once said "there are only three things you should ever be doing on a race track: accelerating, braking and turning"

/-\ = negative toe/ Toe In (view from Top of car)

\-/ = positive toe/ Toe Out (view from Top of car)


LSD

This was just so far off the mark I'm going to start again.

A Limited Slip Differential's function is pretty obvious when you really analyse where the name comes from. First I will explain the obvious: a normal differential in a car allows the inside wheel of a car to turn ever-so-slightly slower than the outside during cornering as it has a shorter distance to travel in the same period of time. This works fantastically except that a diff' will always allow a wheel with less traction to take all the power as a by product of it's primary function (i.e. It allows one wheel to turn faster than the other). On a racetrack this causes a problem because the extreme cornering forces will often cause an inside wheel to lift, all power is transmitted to that wheel and your drive is spun away in a cloud of tyre smoke. To prevent this 'spinning up' a Limited Slip Diff can be fitted. All this does is lock the axle (to a certain degree) when it is under load, meaning that the two (or four) driven wheels can only move at the same speed. This means that no matter how uneven the road, sharp the turn or high your inside wheel: you won't lose any power from the gripping wheel.

A diff can be locked under braking too, too help cars track straight and smooth through braking areas, this can cause problems if you left foot brake though, leading to understeer mid-turn in. You can see the effect of this on a racing car as, ironically, a car with an LSD will tend to squirm ever so slightly under extreme braking forces. Ultimately it is, of course, more stable.
I do this in real life too

PSN: Nachtjager-262
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Posted 08/31/2005 2:45 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Nachtjager's info
Paranoid Wow, this shit was way out of left field. It was like a misguided first grade teacher getting out her red pen for Fumes. What a way to make an introduction and establish credability. Claiming that a FR car has the best weight distribution is odd to say the least. Most of your alterations are just re-wordings and elaborations. You may have been breast fed too long.

As to the actual thread: The votes per setup was a great idea Kerr. It will really pay off as more members join and more setups are posted. Quality over quantity.

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Posted 08/31/2005 10:11 PM Post a reply Quote this post View DTW's info
Actually I can’t agree with (parts) of what you have written above. Most of all is the part about the FR being the best type of car there is. I can’t fault the way you introduced yourself but maybe sending this to Kerr would have been better than posting it here, in the public eye. I do not agree with everything that Fumes wrote in his guide, a lot of it is very practical for actual race cars but I don’t find it as functional in GT4 where the physics are excellent but still lacking.

I have to second Nachtjager, in spirit though not in choice of words. I disagree with your above comments much more than I do with the few very minor (notice the emphasis) parts of Fumes guide I personally (emphasis again) feel are wrong.

Read seperate from above post:
@Kerr: I am beginning to notice a pattern of one post members joining. I am certainly not saying this is the case above but it is a trend none-the-less. They join, post a negative comment of some lose fashion, and are never heard from again. I don’t suppose you have looked into this have you?

PSN: Nachtjager-262
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Posted 08/31/2005 10:16 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Nachtjager's info
DTW- Yes my words were more than likely stronger than they needed to be, but actually it has something to do with the point you bring up of one-message-posters. No point the guy brought up was worth a random rant.

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Vehicle dynamics
Posted 09/01/2005 7:09 AM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
Well I didn't know how else to do it. I couldn't find a 'Contact the Webmaster' section so I thought I'd just post it.

Also, not all of it is just re-wordings and elaboration. Some of what Fumes had written was just plain wrong. Stuff like the bit about oversteer and drifting being different?! What the hell, drifting IS oversteer!

As for the FR comment, think about where the weight is - in any modern FR car (SLR/DB9/612 Scaglietti, which I've driven) the engine is generally set well behind the front axle; at the back you have all the running gear including, usually, a transaxle gearbox that gives more or less 50:50 weight distribution. 50:50 weight distribution means that the polar moment is equally balanced towards the centre of the car, causing less violent rotation should the car start to spin. This makes them very easy cars to drive.

I also love the way you refer to me as a 'misguided 1st Grade teacher' - I do this for a living. I've driven mid engine, rear engine, front engine, front, four and rear wheel drive cars on roads, tracks and rally stages in the sun, rain and snow. I'm a frigging editor, mate and I don't feel the need to establish credibility on a GT4 site. Sorry if I hurt your mate's feelings but I'm right.

Oh and DTW, cheers, but there's no personally about it. Fumes was wrong, often. That LSD section is just not at all how an LSD works. I've asked technicians at Quaife and I've seen them made, they don't transfer power from one wheel to another, they STOP power being transferred from one wheel to another.

Basically, fair play to Fumes for giving it a try, but that guide was clearly written by someone with only a very basic grasp of vehicle dynamics and set-up. You can listen to him if you like, or I'll write a guide that is correct. The offer stands.

Apologies for any offence caused.
I do this in real life too

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Updated 09/01/2005 9:25 AM Post a reply Quote this post View DTW's info
I personally was not offended, though I don’t think you were actually pointing that comment/apology at me, I just figured it is better that I say so than leave it hanging.

I agree that the LSD explanation is wrong and I was personally looking for a more fleshed out explanation than the one you gave. Which to me is pretty basic info, but that may simply be a reflection of my years of love with racing and does not seem to be as basic as I had once thought.

I can’t argue with you on the FR point you made, what I can do is clarify what I said. Upon reading my post over I see that it is lacking, I assumed that you would have picked through the generalness of it to see the unwritten specifics. Then again I am assuming you have played GT as much as I have which is limited to version 3 and 4; a little 1 and 2 but certainly not enough to count. What I meant to say (about FR’s) is that in actual racing a well built purpose FR may be the car of choice; however, GT4 is mostly about your typical street FR and the weight is not around 50/50. Such great cars like you mention are (sadly) not at all well represented in the game.

I would be very interested in reading a tuning guide by you; my email can be found by clicking on my name “DTW” to the left of this post. Also if you don’t mind once I am finished reading it I would like to annotate changes (if I find any) and return the guide to you for revision and/or discussion. I add this part because I can almost predict what you will have to say about shocks (specifically bound and rebound) and what part they play with springs. In playing GT4 I have found they do not replicate the real world function well.

Edited in: The shocks example above is meant to be only one example. There are other parts of GT4 that does not reflect real world very well; then again we are talking about a game so there will be inherent limitations.

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Posted 09/01/2005 12:23 PM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
Then I shall do just that. I'll post it tomorrow eve or Saturday day. It will be 'Track Speed', 'Drift' and 1/4 settings and general info on the effect of different tuning options.

I'll post it here titled: 'Vehicle Dynamics'

Just to be clear: The apology was directed at all concerend.
I do this in real life too

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Posted 09/01/2005 1:34 PM Post a reply Quote this post View DTW's info
Actually I meant to direct it to me, I can’t speak for Kerr and how he would feel about having this thread led further off topic.

Speaking of topic, nice enhancements! Nod

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Updated 09/01/2005 2:22 PM Post a reply Quote this post View GT2000's info
@ MrKipling Disgusted blah blah blah, your setup guide is all well and good but you could tune and mess with settings till the cows come home, either way I'd still woop your arse in the game and I'm sure fumes could do the same!

Yes I may sound big headed and yes I probably would come 2nd to you but what I'm trying to get at is.... who gives a $h!t? A tune guide is a good idea but in all turth I never looked at it as it's just game at the end of the day and if you have the skill to go fast without it then so be it!

Thats not an insult to you or fumes it's just that some of us don't have the time to read and also understand it. This topic has fallen apart due to your input with the guide but once again I would just like to thank Kerr for such a great site and the added addiotions that have been made Nod

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Posted 09/01/2005 5:45 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Nachtjager's info
Oh man, I started to type a reply and the power went out. I hate repeating myself so heres the abridged version.
MrKipling: My reply to your post was because of the way it was presented, not because of any personal feelings. Many of Fumes' setups (and his guide) have helped me enjoy the game to a greater degree. My emotional involvement ends there. I don't know the guy. Now, that you have proved me wrong that you are indeed not a 15 year old snot nosed kid I retract my statements.
FYI: The wemaster email address is in the FAQ. Maybe this could be a new enhancement Kerr- adding the address to the home page.
As for the FR thing, well I agree with both of you. Having the engine behind the front axle can be great on a good car. However, most of the cars in this game have the engine at best over the axle or in front of it. Anyway, I would be interested in reading a guide if it is created.

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Posted 09/01/2005 7:22 PM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
GT2000, for me the setup stuff is a huge part of what I like about the game. It's what separates it from other good driving games.

Anyway, hatchets buried and air cleared, I'll post my setup guide at some point over the weekend. I'll try to keep it brief and useful.
I do this in real life too

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Pre Vehicle Dynamics Post
Posted 09/02/2005 12:27 PM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
This guide has been written as set-up 'SUGGESTIONS', I'll be using examples from Formula 1 as a way of illustrating my points so apologies if you're not 'up' with F1, but it should make sense nonetheless.

The biggest problem with writing a set-up guide is that vehicle settings vary greatly from driver to driver. Both in terms of personal preference as to how a car behaves, and finding a setting that works with a particular driving style to get a fast lap. You'll always read about Juan Pablo Montoya and Jacques Villeneuve struggling with set-ups. They both have extremely aggressive driving styles based very much on oversteery set-up, that causes problems for engineers because it goes against most of the rules for making a car (and particularly tyres) last a whole race. You need to work out what your driving style is before you can really get the best from your equipment.

Before I go on to postinging the different set-up issues outlined by Fumes in his guide, I'd like to explain a couple of terms I'll probably be using. Feel free to skip this bit and come back to it later for reference. For those using steering wheel sets, there might be some things you'd like to try.

Trail Braking: Trail braking is when the driver leaves their foot on the brake during turn-in - going against the commonly held view that all braking should be done in a straight line. Sometimes called 'turning in on left foot' (because the driver will often use his left foot to operate the brake while the right foot stays on the throttle) or 'dipping the nose in' (for obvious reasons) the idea is to be continually transferring the car's weight forward to maintain a progressively increasing pressure on the front tyres whilst approaching the apex. This technique is generally used for bends that would usually require a 'lift-off' or slight brake application. It's other advantage of course, is that it's a great deal smoother than taking your foot off the throttle or braking, as there is very little gap between inputs. This minimises abrupt weight transfer, allows weight transfer to be controlled much more precisely and ultimately (when done correctly) is kinder to the car.

Left-Foot Braking: Exactly the same as trail braking in its effect and technique, but different in application. Left-foot braking is used for five things: Scandinavian Flicks; redistributing weight mid-corner without unbalancing the car; trail braking (see above); holding boost and slowing down mid-corner without unbalancing the car. Essentially it all comes back to controlling the way weight shifts in the car, the less abrupt the change, the quicker you'll go and the less likely you are to be flung off the track into a barrier. It also works as a kind of limited slip diff, stopping a lifted wheel from spinning away too much power. Having said that, if you find yourself in that situation - you have a suspension set-up issue anyway!

Scandinavian Flicks
A Technique used to provoke drifts, usually at (relatively) low speed. The idea is to approach the corner (in this case, a left hander) slightly to the inside of your normal racing line. As you approach the turn in point, flick the car very quickly out to the outside (right hand side) of the track and, in one fluid movement, turn into the bend and dab the brakes with you left foot. This sudden weight transfer will break the tyres grip and cause a slide. At this point you can control the slide with the throttle, the steering, the handbrake and the brakes.

Redistributing weight mid-corner without unbalancing the car
Serves a couple of purposes, particularly in high-tune, well set-up race-cars. Michael Schumacher is famous for his ability to adjust the way a car behaves using left-foot braking. By balancing the car on the brakes throughout the bend, it's possible to change his car's handling characteristics to kill under and oversteer by moving the weight from front to back. To use an example, on a tightening corner you can induce understeer on the entry by lifting off the brakes (Alonso style) and use a stronger application of brakes through the corner to kill it on the exit or even induce mild oversteer (JP Montoya style). Its second function is to kill unwanted understeer: a slight application of the brakes (when the throttle is still open) should slow the wheels enough and transfer sufficient weight to regain traction without inducing lift-off oversteer.

Slowing down mid-corner without unbalancing the car
Use of left-foot braking combined with constant throttle pressure (i.e. don't lift off at all when you apply the brakes, just keep the throttle open and apply the brakes at the same time) can be used to slow down mid corner without losing control of the car. Once again, it allows the driver to regulate the amount and manner in which weight is transferred to the front of the vehicle to prevent 'interesting' 'moments'.

Holding boost:
Only do this in racing games or if the car's not yours. In a bend that requires the revs to drop just below maximum boost in a turbocharged car using 'normal driving techniques' it is possible to avoid the fatal off-boost exit using left-foot braking. Essentially, rather than lifting off and applying the brakes or just lifting off, you simply leave you right foot where it is and apply the brakes with your left foot. With a progressive application of the throttle under braking, it is possible to work the motor against the brakes hard enough to shed the right amount speed without the turbo slowing down too much. At the point when you would normally be flooring the throttle, simply lift your foot off the brake and prepare yourself for a slingshotesque exit.

There are two kinds of oversteer, and two kinds of understeer:

Power Oversteer: Caused by the application of too much power to the rear wheels, spinning them up and breaking tractions with the road. Affects Rear wheel drive and some high-powered 4WD cars.

Lift-off Oversteer: Generally afflicts front wheel drive cars and is caused by the driver lifting off mid-corner. This causes the weight to move to the front of the car causing the rear wheels to lose traction and, because the polar moment is at the front of the car, travel towards the front of the car.

Understeer: Front wheels in a lateral slide towards the outside of a track. Usually possible to recover by inducing lift-off oversteer or using left-foot braking.

Terminal Understeer: When the understeer is so extreme there is no longer enough potential energy in the car to escape it. I.e. there's not enough side-loading to induce lift-off oversteer, but the tyres are so far beyond the limit of adhesion, you just have to wait until the car slows enough to regain traction. Very scary in real life.

Set up guide to follow at some point this weekend. Although there is a GP, so it might be Sunday eve.

Love,

Mr Kipling
I do this in real life too

PSN: Nachtjager-262
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Posted 09/02/2005 11:18 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Nachtjager's info
Nice primer MrKipling. I was just curious, what is your job anyhow? You said editor, but i dont know if thats a loss in translation from British to American. Car Magazine editor?

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Posted 09/03/2005 1:28 PM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
I edit a car/motor sport magazine in the UK. I'd rather not let on which though, so that I can keep saying what I want to without getting into trouble!
I do this in real life too

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Kerr Starion Rally car needs to be altered
Posted 09/03/2005 3:28 PM Post a reply Quote this post View Tibbs's info
There is no VCD option for the Mitsu Starion AWD Rally Car, though it comes as standard equipment, just htought I'd let oyu know.


Also, the new additons to the site are great, keep up the good work.

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Vehicle Dynamics Part 1: Sorting Understeer
Posted 09/05/2005 10:52 AM Post a reply Quote this post View MrKipling's info
1ST IN THE SERIES: UNDERSTEER

Let us begin with some general set-up trouble-shooting. All the suggestions I make assume the following:

No ASM or TC
Starting point is ‘default’ with race (Fully Customisable) suspension/gears/LSD etc

As a general rule, stiffening things makes you quicker but sketchier, softening things makes you slower but the car is easier to drive.

SOLVING UNDERSTEER
Understeer is a problem intrinsically linked with front wheel drive/front engine cars. Obvious when you consider that the bulk of the weight is in the nose of the car and the front wheels are doing both the steering and the driving. In order to make a front engine/front drive car go quickly and not understeer, extreme set-up solutions are usually required. Of course by that I mean that you have to make the vehicle prone to lift-off oversteer – or, in other words, make the car very ‘pointy’. The advantage with FF is that because the rear wheels’ only function is to follow the front, there are no concerns with having to gain forward traction from the back tyres under acceleration at corner exits. This allows for the aforementioned ‘extreme set-up solutions’ to be employed without compromising the cars outright straight-line performance. Bare this in mind when you’re setting up an FF car.

CAMBER
The first port of call when you’re trying to solve understeer is camber. For some reason GT always has default camber set at zero. This isn’t a great idea because it means that when the car is cornering (when you want maximum tyre contact area) the inside edge (the one under the car) is being lifted off the ground, reducing the amount of grip available. Having a slight negative camber on the wheels raises the outer edge of the tyre, meaning that under cornering forces the raised edge is pressed into the track surface, effectively giving you a flat tyre for cornering. Of course, the greater the camber, the greater the cornering forces required to generate sufficient weight transfer to press the tyre into the ground. Ergo, the tighter and slower the course, the more camber it is possible to run. Run severe camber on a track with high speed bends however, and you’re sacrificing cornering speed. Weight transfer will be more gradual and you’ll be cornering on a tyre with only a small percentage of its surface in touch with the road.

SPRING RATES
Spring rates are your next check-point. Make sure that the front is not stiffer than the rear. If it is, bring it to an equal level and try the car again. As mentioned above, the order in which you do it depends on what kind of handling you’re after. For example, if the track is smooth, you may set the spring rates much stiffer (generally 15kg/mm is my upper limit) to begin with. Then, if you’re experiencing a turn-in that changes suddenly into an understeery wash-out mess when the tyres load up, or of course there is no grip at all, you must soften the front springs. If you’re experiencing a slow lolloping slidey understeer that feels ‘mushy’ in the manner in which it breaks away, rather than snappy, you must stiffen the rear shocks. Reducing rear grip slightly will allow the rear to track the front better. Think of it as the difference between trying to turn a metre-long ruler, or two fifty cm rulers with a pivot in the middle.

ANTI-ROLL BAR
Still understeering? Leave your spring rates alone for the time being and check the rollbars (or stabilisers). Soften the front roll bar by a couple of clicks and see how it works. Always bear in mind that the differential between front and rear settings is much more important to a car’s handling characteristics than the outright numbers involved. You can apply the same theory to the rollbars as the spring rates: Rolly Polly: Stiffen rear, Hard and Snappy: Soften front.

TOE-IN/OUT
Before we can understand the use of ‘toe’ or ‘castor’ to eliminate understeer, we must first have a basic grip (pardon the pun) of ‘Slip Angle’. Bizarrely, slip angle has nothing to do with a tyre skidding on the road surface. If you go outside to your (or your parent’s) stationary car and turn the wheel, you’ll notice that the wheel travels some distance through it’s available lock before the contact patch moves on the road. This also happens when the car is moving, although to a lesser degree. The difference in degrees between the angle of the tyre and the angle of the direction of travel is the ‘Slip Angle’. Racing cars generally run with a much great slip angle than that of roads car because (obviously) the speeds and therefore side-loads are much greater at a racing track. It is possible to create what’s known as an artificial slip angle using toe-in. By toeing the wheels in slightly (front edges closer together), that car’s wheels are already turned in when the steering wheel is straight. This means you’ll have less ‘slip’ to work through before the car begins to turn, rather handily, killing understeer. Start at the front and make small adjustments. Changing rear toe-in has a greater effect on corner exits, changing the front has a greater effect on entries. Try to avoid using toe in as a way of addressing understeer and oversteer – it’s not ideal. It’s use will become more clear when we go through FR, MR, 4WD and RR cars.

IMPORTANT:
When you’re setting up the car it is important that you don’t have one suspension element doing all the work. I.e. Springs at 15kg/mm front and rear, Stabilisers set at 5 front and rear and 9 degrees of camber on the front wheels is all wrong.

You must get the camber, roll bars and spring rate settings balanced as a set-up that achieves a specific goal. You must always think of the suspension settings as a suspension setting and remember, your suspension’s only purpose is to keep the wheels on the ground.

(C) Mr Kipling 2005

More to follow, please feel free to print this out and even give to fellow GT Freaks such as myself. Having said that, I won't be pleased if I find it posted on the net (or anywhere else for that matter) as someone else's work. Later.
I do this in real life too

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Joined: 09/05/2005
Last on: 10/03/2005
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Posted 09/05/2005 12:05 PM Post a reply Quote this post View lordsagaris's info
I just logged in and I think this site is fantastic!! many thanks to the webmaster!! Thumbs Up
TVR Sagaris - the best british car ever made!!

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Joined: 06/21/2005
Last on: 03/14/2007
Setups: 5
Posts: 34
Posted 09/06/2005 7:06 PM Post a reply Quote this post View CWood's info
Kerr- A few days ago I tuned a setup for the BMW 320i Touring Car, and the brake balance controller wasn't "standard equipment". Just thought I should let you know. The Votes Per Setup is a great addition, too.

MrKipling- Great stuff, though the initial presentation did come off a little poorly. Keep 'em coming! I have a fairly decent handle on vehicle physics for some stuff (spring rates, ride height, etc), but I'm not so great on a lot of the rest. I'm always on the lookout for accurate tuning information.

Maybe you could pop over to Gamefaqs and submit a real tuning guide there while you're at it here (they need it). WORK, BOY! Wink
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